Cornish Pasties with tender peppery chunks of beef mixed with melt-in-your-mouth vegetables, all wrapped up in buttery golden pastry.  The Cornish Pasty is one of the most famous foods to come out of the south of England, and I can completely understand why the Cornish folk have so much pride in this tasty hand-held meal.

Baked Cornish pasties on a baking tray
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We love visiting Cornwall and often take little trips down south to wander around beautiful little coastal towns.

We often eat a fair few Cornish pasties when we’re there.
In fact Gracey shockingly announced on one occasion that she’d rather have a Cornish pastie than an ice cream!

She was delighted when I told her I’d teach her how to make them.

The Cornish pasty goes back hundreds of years, but they’re most commonly known to have been a staple food of the poorer classes going back to the 18th century. Miners used to take the pasties into the tin mines, and they’d be nutritious and filling enough to keep the workers going all day.
The specific shape of the pastie was thought to have come around for good reason too.
The crimped crust on the side was used as a kind of handle.  The levels of arsenic in the tin mines meant that the miners hands would be grubby and likely covered in this highly toxic substance.  So the miners would hold onto the crust to eat their pastie, and then discard it.

Personally I love the crust, but I think I could be persuaded to chuck it away if it was covered in arsenic!!

Cornish pasty broken in half to show the filling


These Cornish Pasties are filled with a mixture of well-seasoned steak, onions, potatoes and swede (or rutabaga/yellow turnip if you’re in the US). The meat and vegetables are placed in the pastry raw, with a really good pinch of salt and pepper and a few dots of butter, then sealed and cooked in the pastry.  There’s no sauce inside a Cornish pasty, but the cooked filling ends up so tender and moist that it’s not needed.

What do we need

Ingredients for Cornish pasties on a wooden table

How to make the shortcrust pastry

This is a basic shortcrust pastry, so you can replace with shop-bought if you prefer.

  • Place flour, baking powder and salt into a food processor and give a quick mix.
  • Add in cubed butter and whizz until the mixture turns into breadcrumbs.
  • Add in egg yolks and mix, then, with the motor on, add in water a bit at a time until the dough comes together into a ball.
  • Wrap the pastry in clingfilm or wax paper (<– affiliate link) and refrigerate for an hour.
  • Roll out the pastry and cut circles into the dough using a side plate as a template.
8 image collage showing how to make the pastry for Cornish pasties

Making the pasties

Full ingredients, quantities, timings and temperatures in the recipe card at the bottom of the post.

  • Mix cubed potato, swede/rutagaba, onion, steak, salt and pepper in a large bowl.
  • Place a really good handful of the mixture onto on side of one of the pastry circles and dot a little butter on top.
  • Brush egg wash around the edge of the pastry circle and fold the other side of the pastry over the meat until the edges meet and you have a semi-circle.
  • Seal firmly and crimp with your fingers (check out my video below to see how to do this).
  • Make a little hole in the top of the pasty using a sharp knife to let out the steam. Repeat with the remaining pasties and then brush egg wash over the top of all the pasties.
8 image collage showing how to make Cornish Pasties

Bake for 50 minutes until golden brown.

Cornish pasties on a dark serving board with ketchup next to them

You mean you add the meat raw?

Yes! We’re using a good quality cut of beef, so it only needs the light cooking inside the pasty. The juices that are released from the meat during cooking will flavour the veggies and make the filling lovely and juicy.

The best cut of beef for Cornish Pasties

Skirt steak, sirloin or ribeye are the best cuts for the most tender and juicy meat for a Cornish pasty filling.

Note: skirt steak can be a little on the tough side, but small pieces that have been cut against the grain will still be plenty tender enough.

Don’t be tempted to use braising/chuck/stewing beef or the meat will be chewy and tough.

Why don’t they have any sauce/gravy?

The cooking of the meat releases lovely flavoured juices in the pasty. A gravy just isn’t needed!

Besides, ketchup for dipping is a MUST for a Cornish pasty. Well, that’s my opinion anyway.

More Picnic Ideas

Making these as part of a picnic? Here are some more picnic ideas

The Recipe Video:

YouTube video
4.96 from 24 votes

Cornish Pasties

Cornish Pasties – moist and tender traditional hand pies filled with steak, onion, potato and swede (rutabaga)
Prep Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 20 minutes
Servings: 6 pasties
Course: Dinner
Cuisine: British

Ingredients

Pastry:

  • 450 g (3 2/3 cups) plain (all-purpose) flour plus a couple of tbsp extra for rolling out the pastry and sprinkling on the tray later
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 125 g (1/2 cup + 1 tsp) unsalted butter chopped into chunks
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 125 ml (1/2 cup + 1 tsp) cold water

Filling:

  • 450 g (1 lb) potato peeled and finely diced
  • 150 g (1/3 lb) swede/rutagaba peeled and finely diced
  • 150 g (1/3 lb) onion peeled and finely chopped
  • 300 g (2/3 lb) skirt steak or sirloin steak finely chopped, with fat discarded (weigh the meat after discarding the fat)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 3 tbsp unsalted butter chopped into small cubes
  • 1 egg beaten
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Instructions 

  • First, make your pastry. Place the flour, baking powder, and salt into a food processor and give a quick mix.
    450 g (3 2/3 cups) plain (all-purpose) flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 1 tsp salt
  • Add in the butter and whizz until the mixture turns into breadcrumbs.
    125 g (1/2 cup + 1 tsp) unsalted butter
  • Add in the egg yolks and mix, then, with the motor on, add in the water a bit at a time until the dough comes together into a ball. You may not need all the water.
    2 egg yolks, 125 ml (1/2 cup + 1 tsp) cold water
  • Take the pastry out of the food processor, wrap it in clingfilm or wax paper (<–affiliate link) and refrigerate for an hour.
  • Preheat your oven to 180C/350F (fan). Take two large baking trays and sprinkle them with some flour.
  • Take your pastry out of the fridge and roll it out on a floured surface until you get a thickness you can cut, that won't tear easily. I find that's about 3mm.
  • Cut circles into the dough using a plate that is about 20-21cm (approx 8") in diameter as a template. I find that I get 3 circles out of the first lot. Then I re-roll and get 2 circles, and then I re-roll and get one final circle. You can place the circles stacked onto a plate so long as you have a sprinkling of flour between each layer.
  • In a large bowl, mix your potato, swede/rutagaba, onion, steak, salt, and pepper.
    450 g (1 lb) potato, 150 g (1/3 lb) swede/rutagaba, 150 g (1/3 lb) onion, 300 g (2/3 lb) skirt steak or sirloin steak, 1 tsp salt, 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • Take one of your pastry circles and place it onto your work surface. Place a really good handful of the meat mix onto half of the circle, leaving a 2cm border around the edge. It'll look like a lot of mixture, but it needs to be packed full.
  • Dot 1 1/2 tsp butter (from the 3 tbsp butter) on top of the meat and veg pile.
    3 tbsp unsalted butter
  • Take your beaten egg, and using a pastry brush, paint a little of the egg wash around the edge of the circle. This will help the pastry stick together.
    1 egg
  • Now, fold the other side of the pastry over the meat until the edges meet and you have a semi-circle. Seal firmly and crimp with your fingers (check out my video above to see how)
  • Place your pasty onto your baking tray and make a little hole in the top using a sharp knife to let out the steam. Repeat with the remaining pasties.
  • Brush the remaining egg wash over the top of the pasties and place in the oven for 50 minutes until golden brown.
  • Take out of the oven and leave to cool for 5 minutes before eating.

Video

YouTube video

Notes

Can I make them ahead?

Yes, make and cook the pasties, then cool, cover and refrigerate them.
Reheat in the oven, uncovered, at 190C/375F for 30 minutes, until piping hot throughout.

Can I freeze them?

Yes, make and cook the pasties, then cool, cover and freeze.
Defrost in the refrigerator overnight. Reheat in the oven, uncovered, at 190C/375F for 30 minutes, until piping hot throughout.

Can I use shop-bought pastry?

Yes, you can replace the homemade pastry with shop-bough shortcrust pastry.

The best cut of beef for Cornish Pasties

Skirt steak, sirloin or ribeye are the best cuts for the most tender and juicy meat for a cornish pasty filling.
Note: skirt steak can be a little on the tough side, but small pieces that have been cut against the grain will still be plenty tender enough.
Don’t be tempted to add braising/chuck/stewing beef or the meat will be chewy and tough.
.

Recipe Source:

Adapted from a Hairy Bikers recipe
Nutritional Information is per pasty.

Nutrition

Calories: 669kcal | Carbohydrates: 72g | Protein: 22g | Fat: 32g | Saturated Fat: 18g | Cholesterol: 182mg | Sodium: 1026mg | Potassium: 821mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 815IU | Vitamin C: 16.7mg | Calcium: 143mg | Iron: 7.4mg

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

This post was first published in August 2014. Updated in April 2020 with new photos, tips and video.

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Comments

  1. Holly says:

    5 stars
    I made this and WOW, it was the best pastie I have ever had, it even impressed my Cornish partner! My pastry skills are quite poor so we did struggle to make them but they tasted really good. I had mine with mushy peas and gravy (sacrilege, I know) and it was really good. We put a few in the freezer for lunch sometime too. Thank you!

  2. Michiel’s Kitchen says:

    These look amazing, have wanted to try making these for some time, thanks for sharing!

  3. Jamie says:

    Here in the deep South we call these Meat Pies. We make them all the time but the ingredients are a tad different. These pies (pasties) are very easy to make in a large batch and you can freeze some for later. Your recipe sounds delicious and I can’t wait to try it! Thank you for sharing.

  4. Tony Tatman says:

    5 stars
    Living in Cornwall I’d say you’ve nailed this- a Proper job Nicky!

  5. Lindsay Elliott says:

    5 stars
    These are authentic and taste bloody beautiful!

  6. David Darkes says:

    The Cornish pasty was big like 2 times the size of yours one half pasty other side fruit like stewed apple/blackberry for pudding we would take a knife and fork and plate down covered by a tea towel or ripped sheet that was at Redruth mine last working mine in Cornwall was still around in 1963 but i joined Army in 1967

  7. Jacqueline S Strand says:

    Thank you for the tidbits of history and background. I love Winston Graham novels and anything Cornish – would love to travel there but these pasties will have to do. Thank you

  8. Luci Reyes says:

    this recipe sound good. but I don;t understand grams.
    this doesn’t work for me. It would if I understood. I would
    like to make this recipe, but I don;t want to do research.
    plain ,simply and would be nice. I’m not a real cook so to follow
    direction would have to be in Lehman terms. I’m not sure if I
    spelled lehman correctly.

    Thank you.

    Luci

    1. Chris Corbishley says:

      Hi Luci,

      As we are based in the UK our default is Metric. We try our best to cater for a global audience and do have the ability to convert the recipes to US measures for quite a large number of our recipes on our site.

      I have updated the Cornish Pasties recipe today to include that conversion. If you do give them a try please let us know.

      Many Thanks

      Chris

  9. Mary says:

    5 stars
    Just learnt it’s National Cornish Pasty week, and I’m in serious need of some comfort food. Found your recipe and I’m eager to try.

  10. Tina says:

    My Grandmother was from Cornwall and I make pasties but few people here in the states know what they are. My Nana used steak, potatoes and onion only in hers and I make them that way too. Your look very good and a rutabaga or turnip may be good in them as well. I am pinning this to my “Pasties and hand-pies” pin page. Glad other people love them too. They are a bit of Heaven in your mouth!

    1. Nicky Corbishley says:

      Thanks for pinning Tina, you can’t beat a good Cornish pasty! It’s great that you’ve carried on the tradition from your grandma. I love baking my grandad’s recipes – scones and crumbles are a family favourite 🙂